Bloomberg HQ, New York City | October 25, 2017

The Future of Resilient Design: From Sandy to Harvey and Beyond

Hurricane Sandy pummeled the New York area in 2012, causing nearly $50 billion in economic damage and displacing tens of thousands of people. Bloomberg will convene state and local leaders and executives in transportation, energy, technology, and health care to discuss how lessons from Sandy inform opportunities to design a more resilient infrastructure for tomorrow.

From Sandy to Harvey and beyond

Hurricane Sandy pummeled the New York area in 2012, causing nearly $50 billion in economic damage and displacing tens of thousands of people. Harvey recently hit Texas with historic rainfall and untold damage, and Irma threatened to hit Florida and the Caribbean with equal intensity. These mega-storms are prompting regional leaders to reevaluate how to better equip technology systems and infrastructure in case of disaster, and how to better manage disaster recovery.

With this in mind, governments and the private sector are taking a closer look at policies and investments that drive resilient design and minimize risk in cities, communities, and industry. The goal is to develop infrastructure and responsive frameworks that enhance security for businesses and citizens while adapting to emerging demands.

Bloomberg will convene state and local leaders and executives in transportation, energy, technology, and health care to discuss how lessons from Sandy inform opportunities to design a more resilient infrastructure for tomorrow.

October 25 - Wednesday

8:00 am

Registration & Networking Breakfast

8:25 am

The Case for Resiliency: Keynote Interview

Resilient engineering and design require leadership, investment, and vision. A national public sector leader presents the national case for resilience, and the investments and political will communities need to prepare for natural and man-made disasters.

Moderator

Speaker

8:30 am

Opening Remarks

Speakers

9:00 am

Lessons from Recovery: Panel Discussion

Effective disaster recovery is not just about rebuilding—it’s also about meeting the diverse needs of residents, communities, and business. Public sector leaders discuss how the past five years of recovery have informed efforts to build resilient and responsive infrastructure, and their progress in planning and recovery efforts.

Moderator

  • Adam Freed

    Principal, Sustainability, Bloomberg Associates

Speakers

  • Diane Burman

    Commissioner, New York Public Service Commission

  • Upendra Chivukula

    Commissioner, New Jersey Board of Public Utilities

  • Phil Eng

    Chief Operating Officer, New York Metropolitan Transportation Authority

9:30 am

Assessing Needs, Shaping Priorities: Panel Discussion

Technology, public-private partnerships, and infrastructure priorities will all shape the future of resilient design. Experts working on national and local projects share their experiences and ideas on how industry and the policymakers can collaborate to realize the potential of resilient design.

Moderator

  • Adam Freed

    Principal, Sustainability, Bloomberg Associates

Speakers

10:00 am

The Partnership: A Keynote Interview

City-level leaders discuss the importance of intergovernmental cooperation as a critical aspect of infrastructure planning, share case studies and project learnings to date, and future initiatives.

Speakers

10:30 am

State Perspective : A Keynote Interview

A state governor with experience managing response to Hurricane Sandy offers insights on how that storm has informed future resiliency efforts, and what state-level initiatives are in the works to address severe weather events in years to come.

Moderator

  • David Gura

    Co-anchor, "Bloomberg Markets Americas" & "Bloomberg Surveillance", Bloomberg

Speaker

Speakers

Scarlet Fu

Bloomberg Television Anchor

Adam Freed

Bloomberg Associates Principal, Sustainability

David Gura

Bloomberg Co-anchor, "Bloomberg Markets Americas" & "Bloomberg Surveillance"

Tim Holt

Siemens President, Power Generation Services

Colonel Leon F. Parrott Colonel Leon F. Parrott

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Deputy Commander and Deputy Division Engineer, North Atlantic Division

Diane Burman

New York Public Service Commission Commissioner

Upendra Chivukula

New Jersey Board of Public Utilities Commissioner

Phil Eng

New York Metropolitan Transportation Authority Chief Operating Officer

Janice Barnes

Perkins + Will Global Resilience Director and Principal

Greta Byrum Greta Byrum

New America Institute Director, Resilient Communities

Luciano N. Villani, P.E.

Consolidated Edison Company of New York Chief Engineer

Daniel A. Zarrilli, PE Daniel A. Zarrilli, PE

New York City Office of the Mayor Senior Director of Climate Policy and Programs and Chief Resilience Officer

Dawn Zimmer

City of Hoboken, New Jersey Mayor

Chris Christie

State of New Jersey Governor

Siemens Corporation is a U.S. subsidiary of Siemens AG, a global powerhouse focusing on the areas of electrification, automation and digitalization. One of the world’s largest producers of energy-efficient, resource-saving technologies, Siemens is a leading supplier of systems for power generation and transmission as well as medical diagnosis.

Making cities and regions more resilient requires a focus on all aspects of infrastructure, from transportation systems to power grids. Resilient technology is helping to close the gap in order to make cities smarter, safer, stronger and more sustainable for the future. In the U.S., Siemens has provided ConEd in New York City with storm hardening systems that will allow the utility to continue to provide power during flooding, making them more resilient and prepared for the future. Siemens has also developed new technology that makes large power infrastructure equipment like transformers and substations compact and mobile, so they can be placed quickly exactly where needed. Additionally, on-site power systems like microgrids or co-gen facilities can help keep the lights on during major power outages. Building evacuation systems and mass notification technology also play a vital role in emergency situations. Businesses like hotels and office buildings can deploy intelligent voice communication systems to expedite evacuations and provide clear direction to occupants, eliminating confusion and saving lives. And, once people are on the road, adaptive traffic management technology can enable more efficient evacuation. Siemens Concert ATMS, which is deployed in places like State of South Carolina and the City of Seattle, can be used to create evacuation plans by integrating multiple devices, including traffic lights, changeable message signs, highway advisory radio messages, and 511 systems.

Attendance is by invitation only.

 

For any questions or to request an invitation please click here.